Religious Studies Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faith Development

Students acquire and develop Christian values, attitudes and moral standards - based on Catholic teaching; that will influence and inform their choices and behaviour throughout life.  There are numerous opportunities given to the students to develop their spirituality and faith development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KS3 Religious Education 

Key Stage 3 students follow the Fully Alive Series.  Religious Education is instrumental in developing the full potential of each student.  It has a very significant role to play in fostering self-esteem, encouraging tolerance, understanding and respect for others.

 

As Religious Education is not just about knowledge but also experience, strategies will be employed to create an atmosphere which lends itself to the exchange of personal experiences of God. It should also bring the students into a deeper relationship with God through prayer and an appreciation of God’s presence around us.  Opportunities are also provided for pupils to improve their thinking skills and develop their personal capabilities.

Year 9 pupils travel to Knock Shrine, Co. Mayo as part of their unit of work on Pilgrimage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GCSE Religious Studies 

Religious Studies helps the student to explore Christian beliefs and teachings and reflect on current issues and questions related to life. Studying Religious Studies can enhance your personal, social and cultural development and give the student a greater understanding of Christianity.  All GCSE (Year 11 & 12) students will complete CCEA GCSE Religion. (Subject Code - 4610)

Unit 5: Christianity through a Study of the Gospel of Mark.  (Year 11)

This unit introduces students to five themes in the life and ministry of Jesus, as portrayed in Mark’s Gospel.  Students enhance their knowledge and understanding of, and ability to evaluate, key passages. They should consider these passages both within the religious, political, social and cultural context of Jesus’ time, and in terms of how they influence contemporary Christian lifestyle in all its diversity.  Students will study the following five areas

 

  • The identity of Jesus

  • Jesus the miracle Worker

  • The teaching of Jesus

  • The death and resurrection of Jesus

  • The role and nature of Christian Discipleship

 

Assessment

Students will sit an examination paper at the end of Year 11.  It is worth 50% of the total GCSE examination marks.

Each written examination will last 1 hour 30 minutes. There will be some questions which require short answer responses and some which require extended writing.

 

 Unit 6: An Introduction to Christian Ethics.  (Year 12)

This unit introduces students to Ethics in the study of Religion. Students enhance their knowledge, understanding of, and ability to evaluate and explore important ethical issues.  Students will study the following five areas

  • Personal and family issues

  • Matters of life and Death

  • Developments in Bioethics

  • Contemporary issues in Christianity

  • Modern warfare

 

Assessment

Students will sit an examination paper at the end of Year 12.  It is worth 50% of the total GCSE examination marks.

Each written examination will last 1 hour 30 minutes. There will be some questions which require short answer responses and some which require extended writing.

 

AS/A2 Religious Studies

Year 13 students will follow CCEA GCE Religious Studies

  • AS1 - An Introduction to the Gospel of Luke.

  • AS5 - The Celtic Church in Ireland in the Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Centuries.

AS1 - An Introduction to the Gospel of Luke.

Students explore the content of the Gospel of Luke, starting with an understanding of how and why the Gospel was written. Students learn about the religious and political situation in Palestine at the time of Jesus, referring to the beliefs and practices of relevant religious groups. Students learn about key events in the ministry of Jesus, focusing on the Infancy Narrative and early ministry.  This unit introduces students to the Kingdom of God in Luke’s Gospel through a study of selected miracles and parables. Students learn about miracles of healing and raising to life, which is contrary to the laws of nature. During their study of the parables, students focus on the theme of mercy, forgiveness and the Kingdom of God. They study the themes of discipleship and Salvation History within the context of contemporary scholarship. Students also explore the relationship between the Gospel of Luke and other aspects of human experience.

 

 

 AS5 - The Celtic Church in Ireland in the Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Centuries.

Students explore the origins, development and nature of the Celtic Church in Ireland from its pagan roots. They explore the various debates on the arrival of Christianity in Ireland and focus on the mission and writings of Patrick.  Students learn about evidence and scholarly opinion on all the issues they study, along with relevant documents in the case of Patrick. Students focus on the origins and development of Celtic monasticism. They examine the impact and importance of monasticism in Ireland and elsewhere. In the theme of Celtic hagiography, students examine the content and features of key texts along with their historical value and reliability. Finally, they study the development of the claims of Armagh, referring to relevant sources.  Students also explore the relationship between the Celtic Church in Ireland in the fifth, sixth and seventh centuries and other aspects of human experience. 

Assessment

AS1:- Students complete a 1 hour 20 minute externally assessed written paper.

AS5:- Students complete a 1 hour 20 minute externally assessed written paper.

Each paper is worth 50% of AS and 20% of A level.

A2

Year 14 students will follow CCEA GCE Religious Studies.

A21 Themes in the Synoptic Gospels.

This unit builds on the study of Luke’s Gospel completed at AS level. At the start of the unit, students discuss the Synoptic Problem. The focus of study then widens to include the Gospels of Matthew and Mark. The person of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels is a key area of study. Students focus on the ethical teaching of Jesus presenting a challenge to the attitudes of his day. Students critically compare and examine the Passion and Resurrection Narratives against a background of contemporary scholarship.  In the final theme on religious texts, authority and interpretation, students examine issues surrounding the authority of religious texts, such as the differing approaches of fundamentalism and liberalism. The role of leadership and the continuing debate within faith communities is an important issue relating to religious texts. Students initially study this theme in relation to the Synoptic Gospels. It then provides a perspective from which students can consider the content of at least one other unit of study.

 

   

A25 Themes in the Celtic Church, Reformation and Post-Reformation Church.

 

The first sections of this unit consist of a theme in the Celtic Church followed by a similar theme in the Post-Reformation Church. Students learn about missionary outreach, including the motivation and work of the Celtic Peregrini and the importance of Columbanus. This links to missionary outreach in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the challenges posed by secularisation and atheism.  Students also study the theme of controversy and reform through the ages. In the final theme on faith, morality and the state, students consider the relationship between religious faith and state authority. This includes lessons that can be learned from historical and contemporary examples. The role religion plays in reconciliation is an important issue relating to faith and the state. Students initially study this theme in relation to the Celtic Church and Post-Reformation Church history. It then provides a perspective from which students can consider the content of at least one other unit of study.

Assessment

A21:- Students complete a 2 hour externally assessed written paper.

A25:- Students complete a 2 hour externally assessed written paper.

Each paper is worth 50% of A2 and 30% of A level.

 

 

Oratory 

On Thursdays at break time student led meditative prayer is facilitated by our lay Chaplain Paul Flynn. While on Fridays the prayer is based on the forthcoming Sunday Gospel. We pray together using ‘Lectio Divina.’ This provides a prayerful link to the Gospel that is proclaimed at Mass on Sunday in the students' home parishes. 

 

Career possibilities

Religious Studies can offer a wide range of opportunities for further and higher education and interesting and rewarding careers.

Through studying Religious Studies, students will learn how to critically evaluate a range of topics and issues, develop skills in considering evidence and structuring an argument.

Students of Religious Studies can also pursue pathways in:

Teaching

Law

Medicine

Nursing

Public service

Counselling

Journalism

Social work

Charity organisations

Youth work

Community work

 

Liturgy 

The liturgical life of Mount Lourdes is fundamental to nurturing, promoting and developing faith.

Annual Liturgical celebrations include;

  • Opening Mass of the School Year

  • Commissioning of Year 13 Ministers of the Eucharist

  • Mass for the Deceased

  • Mass for the Sick

  • Christmas Carol Service

  • Ash Wednesday Service

  • Year 9 Knock Pilgrimage

  • Year 8 Friendship Masses

  • Leavers Mass

  • Examination Mass

  • Staff Mass. 

 

Prayer forms part of morning form class meetings and Year group assemblies are held on a designated morning each week.

 

Liturgy Committee

The Liturgy Committee consists of elected senior students whose role is to liaise with and assist the Liturgy Co-ordinator and Head of Religious Studies in helping plan, organise and implement some of the main liturgical celebrations throughout the year.  They participate and promote the values of Catholic Education they develop in Mount Lourdes.